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The Second Siege - Henry H. Neff Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts
Original Rating: 3.5 out of 5 Owls

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In the second book to The Tapestry series, Astaroth has already been released from his confinement and is causing trouble in the outside world with his allies. Max McDaniels and his roommate David Menlo are traveling to different worlds on a quest to acquire the dangerous Book of Thoth before Astaroth gets to it first.

I'm sorry if I can't help but compare the series to Harry Potter (actually, I can't help but compare a lot of books to another book/series...). Both series are just so... similar in so many ways. It may sound ironic, but in my humble opinion, Astaroth isn't that... villainy. I mean, sure, he's cunning and evil when necessary, but I'm pretty sure that if Voldy and Astaroth had a face off, Voldy would probably crush him. Big time. Even if he's noseless. Basically because Voldy is evil 24/7.
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On the other hand, Astaroth's "minions" are well... completely the opposite of the Death Eaters. The Death Eaters are pretty loyal, but there's always these little loose knots here and there when it comes to loyalty. Apparently, Astaroth's minions are too loyal to the demon, that there are practically no loose ends at all. One big happy family in taking over the world? Possibly... but don't take my word for granted. I may be wrong for all I know and all of his minions will soon overthrow him as leader of Malevolency.

In a nutshell, you can say I'm sadly disappointed that Astaroth just doesn't seem like a villain at certain times. I don't know. Maybe he'll be more evil later in the series, but for now, I think I'll categorize him a bit as Mr. Nice Guy. I'll nominate him as Dr. Evil II when he has more of the muahaha added in (okay, not exactly muahaha, but closer).
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So, the ending. Er, not exactly. Kind of a happy-sad ending, but not exactly an ending that will make me emotional that I'll need a Kleenex in hand and hide someplace so no one sees me crying, because if I get seen crying, it'll be as embarrassing as saying something in an awkward silence.. But I'm pretty glad that Max and his father saw someone they deeply cared for at least one more time after so many years. It's also not an ending where there's this lovely cliffhanger that keeps you at the edge of the seat, eager to read the next book.

As much as I hate cliffhangers, I just feel that there needs to be some sort of cliff waiting to catch more "victims" at the end when it comes to a series (maybe I'm so used to that frame of mind...), which I find missing in The Second Siege. Though hopefully I'm just missing that cliffhanger and just need to dig deeper...
Neptune's Tears - Susan Waggoner Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts.

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Disclaimer: I received an ARC copy of the book from the publisher via Netgalley. My review is not influenced in any way.

In a futuristic London, England, seventeen-year-old Zee McAdams is an empath – a psychic healer – working at the Royal London Hospital. As an empath, she can't afford distractions getting in the way of her career, such as falling in love or even reading (oh, wait, reading? *squeak of horror*). But then she meets a cute patient who pretty much breaks down her wall of calm that she has earned throughout her career. During that time of anarchist bombings, Zee is also experiencing other psychic abilities relating to the bombings.

As soon as the word "alien" appeared, I pretty much freaked out. I assumed it was going to be another I Am Number Four type of alien story where a mortal girl falls in love with super hot alien dude and it's forbidden but the alien dude hasn't told her the truth yet until something totally out of the ordinary happens and he has to tell her the truth (that was a mouthful... I think). Then when she finds out the truth, she doesn't freak out. It's pretty much, "Oh. Okay. You're an alien. Cool. I still like you, and we'll fight to the end, side by side." Not that I mind, really, but it's just the very fact that the mortal doesn't even have the slightest bit of panic.

In this case, it's not exactly that type of alien story. It finally (FINALLY!) happens that someone actually seemed to panic and run off freaking out (er, more like a what-just-happened-I-don't-think-I-heard-right type of way) about an alien race merging with us fellow Earthlings. I was so happy to read that, having a slice of Dauntless cake right then and there would have been perfect timing.

Zee's friend, Rani, is a fashionista, and a romantic. I find her to be a caring and supportive friend to Zee when she needs it. I also find that she's caring due to what she does for Zee near the end. I find it really sad, since Rani is actually one of my favorite characters in Neptune's Tears.

Waggoner creates an amazingly exciting futuristic world with a lot of new technologies. The very fact that email is being used with a stick and that there's an interactive theater – along with many others – is truly amazing. I would love to live in that type of world and experience it one day.
Afterlife Academy - Jaimie Admans Originally posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts

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Disclaimer: I received a copy of the book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review. My review is not influenced in any way.

I honestly thought I was going to silently scream and run in terror from the first few chapters of reading. Not that it was bad, because it wasn't bad, but because I recently finished Dreamland a few weeks before I started and I didn't think I could deal with any romance components added in (er, I don't think I need to tell why either... because it would be long and this review spotlight is shining on Afterlife Academy, not a required reading from centuries ago *innocent face*).

I think I should now warn of a tad bit of comparing and contrasting between Dreamland and Afterlife Academy throughout. No venn diagrams were created in the process (though I probably did behind the scenes... mentally).

Despite my having to “run and hide” with other good books to relieve myself of the terror, Afterlife Academy was better than I had actually expected. To be brutally honest, I thought it was going to be just as bad and I'd have to permanently stick with mysteries/thrillers (hmm, maybe Stephen King :p) or maybe even other genres for the rest of my life. Or maybe, really hide in an actual closed cubicle. Eep.

Also, despite the fact that the main character Riley is basically complaining throughout the book that she didn't belong at the academy and about her love life with her former live boyfriend, there was just something there that made me not hide in a closed cubicle: Admans' style of writing and the main character's tone.

The tone and style of writing sounded almost like a monologue and it felt like I was more in Riley's shoes (or maybe even right next to her) than just standing in the background the entire watching everything in the book (and time) fly by. Generally, you'll probably feel as though you're lurking around. And then afterwards, you end up asking:
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I would also never have thought that Riley would actually be a humorous person. She didn't really seem that type of person - it seemed more of Narissa's style than Riley's. If anything, Afterlife Academy is a nice change in the Paranormal genre of YA. Because really, where do you usually find a school just for dead teenagers in books? Hogwarts doesn't really accept them (it's sad if you ask me...) and they're hardly mentioned.
Fury of the Phoenix - Cindy Pon Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts

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*Warning: May contain minor spoilers from the previous novel*

Remember the evil sorcerer by the name of Zhong Ye from the previous novel, Silver Phoenix? In Fury of the Phoenix, the sequel to Silver Phoenix, it's been a few months after Zhong Ye's death and Ai Ling receives warning from a dream that Chen Yong is in danger. Knowing that, Ai Ling finds a way to try and find him.

During Ai Ling's journey, we go through a few flashbacks throughout the book entering Zhong Ye's life when he's just a worker in the Emperor's Palace (I'm not talking about the buffet) trying to climb up in rank to how he came to be in Silver Phoenix. Ai Ling and Chen Yong have also changed a lot and matured a bit (maybe a lot?) since the previous novel.

I'm not exactly sure what to make of the second (and I think final?) component to the Kingdom of Xia series. I personally picked up the series because it was based on Ancient China (just in general terms – there are fictional stuff as well) and thought it would be really interesting to read. But staying away from the series – actually, I never even knew a sequel existed until I joined Goodreads – and then coming back to it has made me realize that I'm missing out in the world that Cindy Pon creates in Silver Phoenix and Fury of the Phoenix. In fact, I even miss the dumplings and buns. And that's coming from someone who has those often... :p I also want to visit China one day, though I certainly don't want to meet some of the unpleasant creatures both Ai Ling, Chen Yong and Zhong Ye encounter in the book.
Incarceron  - Catherine Fisher, S. November, Sammy Yuen Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts

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I didn't think I would like Incarceron. The synopsis wasn't very appealing during the selection at the book club meeting. The only thing that I found appealing was the very fact that a prison is "alive" and has a mind of it's own.

Finn is one of the prisoners of Incarceron, with no memories whatsoever from his childhood and believes that he has not been a part of Incarceron his entire life as others say. The Warden's Daughter, Claudia, is trying to escape an arranged marriage as a part of a scheme she doesn't want to be a part of for certain reasons and claims that Finn is from the Outside.

Both Claudia's and Finn's views are from separate "worlds" but they both eventually cross-sect each other. I would be lying if I said I liked Claudia's view over Finn. Finn's view, however gloomy his life may seem, is more adventurous with avoiding the Winglord and trying to find an escape route from Incarceron. Claudia's view, on the other hand, seems to be more of... avoiding schemes and wanting no part of it after she finds out the end results.

Despite the fact that the end was, in fact, spoiled away by one of my friends, I thoroughly enjoyed Incarceron. Catherine Fisher creates a fictional world in a supposed paradise of an animate prison built from centuries ago (I would love to see the prison myself... minus the conditions... of course).
Parrot in the Oven: Mi Vida - Victor Martinez, Steve  Scott Original Review Posted at Bookwyrming Thoughts

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Oh. Another required reading. Yay. After Dreamland's disaster, I was going to call it quits here and go hide in a cubicle for awhile. Not that it's bad idea... but I'm pretty sure I would've failed high school already with that many absences (so not happening).

Parrot in the Oven: Mi Vida is about a fourteen-year-old boy named Manny who lives with his abusive father and just wants to fit in with the others around his neighborhood.

I had hoped that Parrot in the Oven was going to be majorly better than our last reading in English. I guess it went out okay in the end, but I ended up flipping back and forth to find a certain something.

A glossary, which I didn't find to my misfortune. With the Spanish terms and translations that were used in the book at the least. It would've have helped me so much since I haven't taken Spanish. Okay, there were a few translations in English after the Spanish throughout the book, but not all of them. I still say that a glossary would have been majorly helpful (and not just to me... I hope). In fact, I have no clue what the title says. Besides the Parrot in the Oven part. I
guess it's time to stroll on over to Google Translator.

Parrot in the Oven, is a bit different, but similar when compared to other realistic fiction. It might just be me and realistic fiction (because I'm definitely not it's biggest fan, considering the fact I rarely give realistic fiction a high rating...), but there tends to be not so much going on, besides a typical Mexican American teenager with family problems typically contained in realistic fiction and wanting/trying to fit in with others (also typically found in realistic fiction). I might be wrong with that view.

*holds up warning sign* ATTENTION: MINI-SPOILER ALERT!

You have been warned of the next paragraph containing tiny mini-spoilers that may give away a tad bit too much information about the book. Continue at your own risk.

The end tends to be rushed into 2-3 chapters. Manny was going on with his typical life, until a disaster at a party, and then boop. He decides to join a gang. Shortly after, boop. Someone gets in trouble, he realizes something within just hours/a day and boop. Goes home and "happily ever after," the end.
Tempest - Julie Cross Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts

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I really hope I'm not the only one when I say that I read Tempest so fast, my head must have been spinning after I finished. Eh, 3 days probably isn't that fast, but compared to my usual pace, it is. I may have read it fast because I was dying of boredom during Spring Break. Or beginning to.

The main character, Jackson Meyer, jumps so much from time to time throughout the book that it would've been really hard to keep track where and when he's at without the date and time in the beginning of almost every chapter. In fact, I would have been so confused and lost, I might assume I landed in of Wonderland or stuck in the middle of a tornado (Kansas style), about to land in the world of Oz (though I won't know that until I actually land in Oz).

I can't really tell who the villain really is. Julie Cross makes it seem that there are 5 possible villains, with a handful of those that seem to be leaning toward the not-a-villain-at-all side.I didn't really want to finish the last few pages of Tempest at night, but eventually decided to just get it over with (after all, why save 2-3 pages for the next day when you can finish it in less than 30 minutes?).

Wrong choice on my part, even though it was likely the right choice for the main character to do in the end. But I was honestly not prepared for it to be extremely sad.

I'm not exactly sure what to make of Tempest. I generally enjoy time travel books because they're are each unique in their own way, with their own time travel rules. I'm not exactly sure how Tempest is going to work on the big screen but it'll be interesting to see how it works if it actually does get to the big screen.
Fire (Elements of Power, #1) - Heather     James Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts
Original Rating: 3.5

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Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for a honest review. My review is not influenced in any way.

Fire turned out to be better than I expected, in most cases. Can I still mention how dreadful cliffhangers are? They're quite agonizing. Very painful, in fact. And here there's a dreadful (in a good way) last sentence staring (hopefully not laughing silently) in my face.

There tends to be a lot of errors found throughout Fire here and there. While I may have originally wanted to give it a lower rating than currently because the errors interrupted the fluency and flow, a few things I thought about for a few days made me change mind and give it a bit higher rating instead:

I love Roxy's character. She seems to have an interesting life as a Protector of the Helian Realm, and she turned out to be a much better character than I had thought she was. She also has this sort of smart-alecky personality.

Jasmine, on the other hand, was meh. Her side of the story seemed to lag a bit for awhile – more about partying and celebrating and Brae. It was more interesting later. In fact, once I got into the interesting part, I forgot to watch the time and missed the first few minutes of Grimm. I probably should've continued reading though, since that black fly person episode, which I can't figure out the name besides the fact it sounds like Jinnamu Xinto, was utterly disgusting.

In some books, I sometimes want to hug a character, glare at the character, throw something at the character, or just something else entirely with reason, but can't since they're fictional. All I can do is have a hair-tearing frustration or turn into a virtual cheerleader on the sidelines. (No offense, really.)

Fire is one of those books. There's probably a whole list of characters, but I'll probably name some. I would probably hug Roxy because of how she turned out later, even if it as the words "TROUBLE" written all around it from every side and angle. I would probably give Jasmine the not-amused face because of her chosen decision near the end, though there might be a reason. (I won't forget to add that cliffhanger to the list...) I guess I can just ponder on that for now. I would probably facepalm Brae. Just for being a bit irrational and being a bit of an "air-head" near the end. It might just be to satisfy someone else though. But I'll never know until possibly later, so I'll just stick with facepalm for now. I'll give him credit for being different from his people and not believing until he sees it.

And I would definitely throw something at Cin. Just for turning out to be opposite of what I really thought. I guess some characters don't turn out the way they seem and are a bit full of surprises with their actions/decisions sometimes, until it's actually revealed.
Graceling - Kristin Cashore Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts
Original Rating: 4.5

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I've heard both good reviews and bad reviews, so like any book, I've had mixed feelings. But I've been wanting to read Graceling since I saw it sitting on the front shelves (where all the Gateway/Truman Award Books are at usually) last year. I just never got the chance to read it until I put it on my 2013 TBR Pile Challenge list (hmm... maybe joining challenges can do me some good after all).

I'm glad to say that Graceling wasn't as bad as I feared it might be. It might be me and fantasy books, or it might just be because Graceling was different from other books I've read. It does have a really pretty cover though.
Like any typical fantasy book, there's a different world. In this world, people with an extreme talent or skill are called Gracelings, and they are generally feared by ordinary people and are “outcasts.” The main character, Katsa, has the Grace of killing and works under King Randa of the Middluns, until she meets Prince Po of Lienid.

What's really surprising is how the author manages to not make the villain very obvious off the bat like other books would normally do until later in the story, when Po and Katsa are actually discussing possible suspects *breaks off sentence before too much comes out*. Who knew such a Grace could be so deadly and powerful?

I'm wondering though, if the villain is gone here, are the other unpleasant ones going to be the villains in the 2nd or 3rd book? No spoilers please!

There are a few parts in Graceling that are probably not recommended for younger/immature (not that I'm calling younger ones immature – there are mature ones as well) people to read. Consider yourself a bit warned.
The Grimm Diaries Prequels Volume 1- 6: Snow White Blood Red, Ashes to Ashes & Cinder to Cinder, Beauty Never Dies, Ladle Rat Rotten Hut, Mary Mary Quite Contrary, Blood Apples - Cameron Jace,  Danielle Littig Prequels are reviewed separately on Goodreads and my blog.

Snow White Blood Red
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/02/review-snow-white-blood-red-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335233

Ashes to Ashes & Cinder to Cinder
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/02/review-ashes-to-ashes-and-cinder-to-cinder-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335326

Beauty Never Dies
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/02/review-beauty-never-dies-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335344

Ladle Rat Rotten Hut
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/03/review-ladle-rat-rotten-hut-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335368

Mary Mary Quite Contrary
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/03/review-mary-mary-quite-contrary-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335392

Blood Apples
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/03/review-blood-apples-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335404
The Grimm Diaries Prequels Volume 1- 6: Snow White Blood Red, Ashes to Ashes & Cinder to Cinder, Beauty Never Dies, Ladle Rat Rotten Hut, Mary Mary Quite Contrary, Blood Apples - Cameron Jace,  Danielle Littig Prequels are reviewed separately on Goodreads and my blog.

Snow White Blood Red
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/02/review-snow-white-blood-red-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335233

Ashes to Ashes & Cinder to Cinder
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/02/review-ashes-to-ashes-and-cinder-to-cinder-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335326

Beauty Never Dies
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/02/review-beauty-never-dies-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335344

Ladle Rat Rotten Hut
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/03/review-ladle-rat-rotten-hut-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335368

Mary Mary Quite Contrary
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/03/review-mary-mary-quite-contrary-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335392

Blood Apples
Blog: http://bookwyrming-thoughts.blogspot.com/2013/03/review-blood-apples-by-cameron-jace.html
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/463335404
Blood Apples (The Grimm Diaries Prequels, #6) - Cameron Jace Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts

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Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review. My review is not influenced in any way.

Hark who's talking. And so Prince Charming speaks. Snow White's Prince Charming. Actually, I'm surprised he's alive. Didn't he pretty much die by the hands of the very Snow White in prequel numero uno, which the Queen of Sorrow, along with others, witnessed? I might be wrong (Memory Lane is full traffic at this time). The likely worst case scenario that probably happened may have been good old Charming turning into whatever Snow White is (really, I shouldn't spill the “prediction” beans right now).

I'll leave you to ponder on that. If you haven't read it. If you have read it, yay. It's not exactly spilling any beans... or did I just spill a handful (I hope I didn't... Dx)?

In Blood Apples, we have Prince Charming, who's apparently older now, looking for Snow White in the Kingdom of Sorrow and wants to save her from wherever she's at. There are hints of the other prequels that crossover, so a certain color is still banned and we have a pair of old characters come back, along with a few new ones (I won't say which ones). In my humble opinion, Prince Charming isn't that bad, if he is whatever Snow White is now, besides chasing her all over the place [to the ends of the world] in hopes she can be found (I won't say if she is found either).
Though the author mentions in the Author's Notes that there are hints to 3 works (not fairy tale-ish), I found it more of Romeo and Juliet (which is one of the 3 – no I didn't read it, but I have the slightest idea of what happens there), especially near the end. I guess I'll figure out how the other 2 are similar to the prequel when I actually read them... in school, with the likely case scenario being required reading (I'll be sure to take note not to complain if it is). Or maybe I'll never find out, unless I ask Google once more for assistance.

I'm curious about the very end though... and I'm probably confused if the actual diaries will be in present day (aka, parallel-like world while we're continuing with our lives, oblivious to whatever else going on but factual stuff) or just records of past events (in fictional terms – you won't find it in your history textbooks). I guess I'll find out eventually in the near future.
Shadow Bound - Angel Lawson Original Review Posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts
Original Rating: 4.5

Disclaimer: I received this book from the author for free in exchange for an honest review. The review is not influenced in any way.

It's another one of those stories with a minor to majorly strange title in which the meanings of it are figured out with the following ways: a) woven throughout the pages and only reading will enlighten you, b) it's in the dictionary and it has a double meaning, which definitely isn't the typical definition you generally hear, or c) you simply never find out why.

Well, it's been a while since the situation with Evan and his family has passed. It's now summer vacation and it's been ghost-free for Jane and Connor for some time. At least for awhile. It's not along until another ghost comes along, and it's worse than Evan's situation.

I like how Shadow Bound is a different situation to both Jane and Connor than what they're used to. It's a bit more challenging for them, and we find out more about Jane's ability, which is different than what she thought it was. I'm surprised that Ruth was willing to help and warn Jane later; she seemed too lost to help, much less warn.

I'm confused a few times, especially a bit at the beginning, but overall, I found Shadow Bound better than Wraith in a way. I am hoping, however, that if there's ever a *insert one word spoiler*-sized ghost, both Jane and Connor have better luck, despite the tedious situation they'll be in.
Seizure - Kathy Reichs Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts

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I had no clue why the title was Seizure. For all I knew, seizure meant something to do with a stroke or a heart attack and could possibly result in death if not fixed ASAP. I could be wrong with that definition as well. What I never knew however, was the other definition. The Dictionary enlightened me:
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I guess I was partially right. Apparently there goes proof I'm not a walking/talking dictionary. Living proof. I'm honestly better off as a spellchecker any day. I must be bored if I did know the definition for every word that exists. Extremely bored. To the point of desperation. Which isn't happening any day until the zombie apocalypse at the least.

Seizure is the second novel in the Virals series (first book is Virals, but my review for it never existed on this planet because my book blogging life never existed at the time) written by Kathy Reichs. It's been awhile after the Virals have transformed from a super-virus. Due to financial problems, Loggerhead Island is at risk to be shut down, and the Virals may have to separate, facing the super-virus on their own. At least until Tory Brennan hears about Anne Bonny's legend. It's said that her treasure is buried right in Charles Town, but no one has succeeded in finding it for around 3 centuries.

What I like about Seizure is the storyline. It's creative, and it twists a legend (I don't know the actual legend though) to fit in with what's going on with the Virals after their transformation. I also love how the characters have changed a lot from the first novel, or at least, most of them, and how there are new characters introduced. Whitney's still as annoying as before (just get out of Tory's hair already! Dx) and Chance hasn't changed much. As for everyone else? Well, I can't say. I can say they changed, but I can't say how. I might as well tape an index card on my forehead with the words SPOILER.

What I dislike? My prediction (always. I fear I'm aiming correctly... even though I have terrible accuracy). I sense a love triangle coming soon. And as typical as it goes with love triangles in YA, it might get ugly with the tension. The best part about that though? I might be off the mark. Or I may be bull's eye (I hope not!). Don't take my prediction for granted. It's just a thought. I might be wrong, or I might be right. I guess we'll see.

Speaking of which, the third book in the series, Code, came out last Wednesday, March 12. Who's excited for a new Virals adventure? :D
Daynight - Megan Thomason Original Review posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts

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Disclaimer: I received the updated copy from the author for free in exchange for an honest review via a Read & Review program on Goodreads. My review is not influenced in any way.

Updated, you ask? Yes, updated. I apparently got the book from Amazon for free last year (read: December). I took the chance to be one of the reviewers so I can clean up my Kindle App Library (little by little), which is growing but that wasn't the actual reason why I was interested in Daynight (maybe partially though).

I was interested in Daynight due to the fact that a) the cover caught my eye (I don't judge books by covers, but it's subconscious. Moi can't help it sometimes :(), b) the synopsis was good, and c) why not? It might even be the next Divergent (hey, I'm not saying it is) or another one of my favorite novels and land on my favorites shelf (not that I have any. I treasure every good book... although some stick out).

I found the storyline unique compared to other dystopian fiction. Most dystopian fiction are set in the future, when the world has already hit the apocalypse or something of the similar sort. In Daynight, however, Earth is still there. Life is still continuing, no apocalypses. Instead, there's a parallel-like world, with strict, dictatorship-like rules. But like other dystopians, Daynight also has a corrupt government and there is a group of people wanting to overthrow it.

The way Ms. Thomason starts and ends each chapter is intriguing, especially with the first and last sentence. I also liked the way the flashbacks are set up from time to time between character POVs, however I seemed to get lost after awhile on what was going on in the story from time to time. The flashbacks tell us what's going on to other characters in the story, working behind the scenes of what the story was currently paused at before the flashback and keeping the reader curious on what will happen next.

Daynight has a few twists and turns here and there throughout the story, a handful of them unexpected, surprising or shocking. Maybe even all three. But I'm curious what will happen to Kira, Ethan, and Blake as well as what the SCI is really up to (besides you-know-what) in the future of the series (no, I don't have my predictions. Besides happily-ever-after?).
Mary Mary Quite Contrary (The Grimm Diaries Prequels, #5) - Cameron Jace Original Review posted on Bookwryming Thoughts
Original Rating: 4.5

Disclaimer: I received this book from the author for free in exchange for an honest review. The review is not influenced in any way.

At first, I thought it was going to be told by Bloody Mary. Apparently, I was wrong. It's told by someone else. I should probably warn this review and story should not be read by kids 13 and under. Unless you can handle scary stories better than I can. Which is... pretty terrible from what I remember. No record of improvements. Yet.

I found Mary Mary Quite Contrary to be more of a Fairy Tale and History Lesson of Legends. And a pretty entertaining one at that, what with the point of view the story is written in. With that thought in mind, I was hoping that I wouldn't scream bloody mary murder in the middle of the night with my tendency of attracting nightmares like a magnet when I read a horror story. Those usually last for days... especially Bloody Mary's legend.

Coincidentally, I ended up reading the story of one of the characters mentioned. I just didn't know about the devices that she used *shudders* but since I read only one source about creepy night creatures and legends, I give no comment (legends get twisted in so many ways from the actual). Besides the fact it's actually pretty gruesome if you think about it if you actually look her up after you read Mary Mary Quite Contrary.

I definitely don't know about the actual legend with Bloody Mary, besides the fact that if you called her name three times in the bathroom in the dark, she'll pop out and murder you. It also didn't matter what age you were. In this case, it seems to be a room with a mirror instead and teenagers. Yikes. No wonder restrooms make sense with the twisting of legends. Then again, I heard other twists to that as well from fellow classmates when I was younger. It's pretty typical with the twists.

I don't think I want to try it though. Like I mentioned earlier, that story haunted me for years. I blame my fellow classmates for even mentioning it. You guys have haunted me with a story for what might be eternity (it went away but you can rarely run from famous legends, especially scary ones, can you?). I still don't get the nursery rhyme that's mentioned though. Maybe I'll ask Professor Google about it later.

I once again found the Author's Notes at the end helpful in a way, but with one of the notes dinging a warning bell in my head, I better be careful when I read the actual diaries. No, I'm not avoiding the actual diaries like the plague when they come out. I'm one of those peeps who gets the shivers when reading scary stories.